Share Print Bookmark

Notes


Matches 61,601 to 61,697 of 61,697

      «Prev «1 ... 613 614 615 616 617

 #   Notes   Linked to 
61601 William moved to Oregon.
----------
Reference:
Dee Lansford GEDCOM, 24 September 1995. 
Burns, Rev. William Frederick "Rick" (I53459)
 
61602 William Peart Sr. came from England to Oxford Township, Philadelphia County,
Pennsylfania; in 1806 he bought two tracts in Armstrong County on the Alleghany
River at the mouth of Pine Run, and the following year built a sawmill there at
what was to become Mosgrove, Pennsylvania; he owned additional lands and a
grist mill in Valley Township.

The will of William Peart of Kittanning Township, written 30 July 1828,
probated 27 August 1828, bequeathed $100 to each of two grandchildren, son and
daughter of son Benjamin Peart (they lived near Philadelphia); to daughters
Susan Bainbridge and Maria Johns, certain bonds against Philip Mochling and
Simon Torney; to wife Susan her support her lifetime. A codicil of 1 August
1828 leaves land on Pine Creek and Alleghany River, "where I now reside", to
granddaughter Rachel Peart, daughter of son William L. Peart. A second codicil
same date mentions a previous deed to son William L. Peart and makes it clear
that sons, Benjamin and William were living at the time of writing. Witnesses:
E. S. (Eben Smith) Kelly, William L. Peart, Samuel McMaster.

In 1821 William Peart Sr. had conveyed to William Jr. 300 acres 80 perches in
the south part of Pine Grove and had agreed in 1828 to convey another parcel of
248 acres including grist and saw mills; this latter sale was consumated by the
widow Susan in 1832.

On 20 June 1842 Alcy Pert, widow of William L. Peart late of Pine Township,
deceased intestate, petitioned for guardianships for her children, Eliza Jane,
Margaret M., Else Anne, Nancy G., Mary Adeline, and Esther E. Peart, all minors
under fourteen years. A. L. Robinson was so appointed with James Cochran as
Surety in the amount of $600.

On 21 September 1846 an inquest of partition was requested concerning the real
estate of William L. Peart of Pine Township, 348 acres adjoining James Cochran,
Samuel Hutchinson and land previously sold by William L. Peart to Walter Sloan
his brother-in-law. Peart's heirs were eleven children: Rachel wife of William
Meaner of Indiana County, Pennsylvania, Rosanna wife of Samuel Cochran,
Susannah Peart and Samuel Peart, all of age; also William, Eliza Jane,
Margaret, Else Anne, Nancy, Adeline and Easter Peart, minors.

Before his death William L. Peart had contracted to sell part of his land,
including the mills to his brother-in-law, Walter Sloan, but there was much
delay in completing the transaction; suit was brought against Robert E. Brown,
Administrator of Peart's estate and on 3 January 1849 subpoenas were issued for
all of the heirs.

On 21 December 1846 Sharon Manteer was appointed guardian of Eliza Jane and
Margaret Peart; both girls were then over 14 years and both guardianships were
discharged 3 March 1856. Bond was for $500 with Jonathan Sloan as Surety. On
19 Jun 1849 on petition of Samuel M. Peart, Thomas McConnel was appointed
guardian for Nancy G., Adeline and Esther E. Peart, all under 14 years. Bond
was for $1000 with William Robinson as Surety.

This Peart estate was continued over many years until all of the children were
grown up and until after the death of the widow. There were distribution
payments from time to time with many releases and receipts. In a final
affidavit dated 18 February 1884, S. M. Peart lists the heirs as follows:
Isabella Peart, wife of William S. Peart, now wife of Joseph Campbell; Rachel
Peart, widow of William Manor; Rosannah Peart wife of Samuel Cochran; Susanna
Peart, widow of Samuel Sloan; Eliza Peart wife of John Meanor; Margaret Mateer
now wife of Chris Foster, only child of Margaret Peart and Robert Mateer now
deceased; William L. Frank and Adella Frank, only children of Elsi Anne Peart
and Ezra Frank both decased; Nancy P. Peart wife of A. J. Thompson; Adeline P.
Burgess; and Esther Peart wife of David Prugh.
----------
Reference:
McTeer - Mateer Families of Cumberland County Pennsylvania, Frances Davis
McTeer, 1975, p 65. 
Peart, William Lee (I6879)
 
61603 William Peart Sr. came from England to Oxford Township, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; in 1806 he bought two tracts in Armstrong County on the Alleghany River at the mouth of Pine Run, and the following year built a sawmill there at what was to become Mosgrove, Pennsylvania; he owned additional lands and a grist mill in Valley Township.

The will of William Peart of Kittanning Township, written 30 July 1828, probated 27 August 1828, bequeathed $100 to each of two grandchildren, son and daughter of son Benjamin Peart (they lived near Philadelphia); to daughters Susan Bainbridge and Maria Johns, certain bonds against Philip Mochling and Simon Torney; to wife Susan her support her lifetime. A codicil of 1 August 1828 leaves land on Pine Creek and Alleghany River, "where I now reside", to granddaughter Rachel Peart, daughter of son William L. Peart. A second codicil same date mentions a previous deed to son William L. Peart and makes it clear that sons, Benjamin and William were living at the time of writing. Witnesses: E. S. (Eben Smith) Kelly, William L. Peart, Samuel McMaster.

In 1821 William Peart Sr. had conveyed to William Jr. 300 acres 80 perches in the south part of Pine Grove and had agreed in 1828 to convey another parcel of 248 acres including grist and saw mills; this latter sale was consumated by the widow Susan in 1832.
----------
Reference:
McTeer - Mateer Families of Cumberland County Pennsylvania, Frances Davis
McTeer, 1975, p 65. 
Peart, William (I7570)
 
61604 William Ragan was born on his paternal grandfather's farm in the Emert Cove
area of Sevier County, Tennessee. Here he lived until the migration to Maury
County, Tennessee with his brother John Henry Ragan between 1840/1850.

He was listed with his mother, Susannah Ogle Ragan in the 1830 Federal Census
of Sevier County, Tennessee.

Sometime between 1840 and 1850, he and his brother John Henry Ragan migrated
together to Maury County, Tennessee from Sevier County.

The locality of his marriage his marriage has not been confirmed.

He and his wife were listed in the 1850 Federal Census of Maury County,
Tennessee. There were no children listed in the household. But they were
living next door to his brother and sister-in-law, John Henry Ragan and Amanda
Derryberry Ragan at that time.
----------
Reference:
"Smoky Mountain Clans", Donald B. Reagan, 1978, p 14.
"The Book of Ragan/Reagan", Donald B. Reagan, 1993, p 197, 198. 
Ragan, William (I3848)
 
61605 William Reason Reagan went to Texas in 1849 and settled first in Red River
County. There he attended McKinney College. After leaving that institution,
he taught school for two years at Marlin, Falls County. During his spare time,
he studied law and in 1857 was admitted to the bar. He opened an office and
practiced law. In 1874, he romoved to Reagan, a small town named for him. In
1880, he moved to Georgetown where he lived until his death.

During the Civil War, he first enlisted in the 13th Cavalry, but in 1862, was
appointed enrolling officer for Falls County. While the war was in progress,
he was entrusted with an important mission to Richmond, Virginia in the
interest of the Postal service of the Confederacy.

In 1865, he was elected judge of Falls County.

"The Waco Examiner" records an episoded that took place during the
reconstruction days in the State of Texas:

"Judge Reagan, from Falls County, was arrested on the 5th inst., on the square,
and carried to the military camp. The following are the particular: The Judge
was suspected of having thrown a brick-bat into the military camp, and upon
this suspicion was arrested by the soldiers, and liberated shortly after his
arrest. The Judge again appeared on the square armed, and the Sheriff, Mr.
Morris, interpreting his demonstration as hostile, arrested him again, and upon
which he was taken by the U.S. soldiers in the custody at their camps."
----------
Reference:
"Smoky Mountain Clans", Donald B. Reagan, 1978, p 9, 13.
"The Book of Ragan/Reagan", Donald B. Reagan, 1993, p 47, 58, 59. 
Reagan, William Reason (I727)
 
61606 William Riley Ragan was a Rural Mail Carrier.
----------
Reference:
"Joshua Reagan", Lula F. Shelton, 1982.
"The Book of Ragan/Reagan," Donald B. Reagan, 1993, p 374. 
Ragan, William Riley (I4973)
 
61607 William Rolen Stucker lists given name as William.

Johnie Williams was killed by a man named Stephens. He lived up near Chad Herrel's. He hit Johnnie on the head with an iron spikeat at a saw mill down near Curt Huff's. They brought him up to Bobby's old log cabin that afternoon where he died. Stephens went to North Carolina but was brought back to
Sevierville, Tennessee where he was kept in a mule stable until he was tried and hung.
----------
Reference:
"Smoky Mountain Clans, Volume 2", Donald B. Reagan, 1983, p 29.
"Joab and Anna (McMahan) Rolen Family", Bonita McMahan Rough, March 1995, p 3, 4, 6, 7.
"A Genealogy of the Rolen Family of Sevier County, Tennessee," Wilma Rolen Stucker, 1980, p 3.
John D. Radford Pedigree Charts, 1995, p 11.
"Sevier County, Tennessee and Its Heritage", 1994, 389. 
Williams, John "Johnnie" (I34451)
 
61608 William Sawyer came from England and is first found in Salem, Massachusetts in
1640; afterwards in Wenham, Massachusetts in 1643 and the next year in Newbury,
Massachusetts where he settled and raised his family.

William Sawyer was one of the founders of the Baptist Church at Newbury in
1682. He lived in or near what is now West Newbury, Massachusetts.
----------
Reference:
"Some descendants of William Sawyer of Newbury, Mass.", William S. Appleton,
1891.
"A Genealogy of Some of the Descendants of William Sawyer of Newbury, Mass",
Nathaniel Sawyier, 1889, p 4. 
Sawyer, William (I22239)
 
61609 William Shields immigrated from Ireland to New Castle, Delaware and settled in Frederick County, Maryland.

William Shields had a large family according to a letter written by a near relative, William Hathaway, in 1790. One descendant, John Knight Shields, was born 15 August 1858, Clinchdale, Tennessee and served as U. S. Senator and Justice of the Supreme Court of Tennessee. By many writers this William is referred to as "the emigrant."
-----------
Reference:
"Kin of my Grandchildren, Vol III", Judge Noble K. Littell, 1992, p 8, 9-10.
"Research on the East Tennessee Shields Families", Katherine Susong Harmon, abt 1968. 
Shields, William (I29652)
 
61610 William Shields lived in Delaware and Chester County, Pennsylvania.
-----------
Reference:
"Kin of my Grandchildren, Vol III", Judge Noble K. Littell, 1992, p 7.
Misty Spinelli.
"Shields Family", Christine B. Brown, 6 February 1980, p 40, 45. 
Shields, William (I9103)
 
61611 William Shields served in the Black Hawk War, served in the Indiana State
Legislature in 1839-1840, was a farmer, millwright, boatsman and a democrat.

Christine Brown lists birth as 1801 and death in Seymour, Indiana.

On the 16th day of September, 1816, the county court met and ordered that the jail at Brownstown, built by John Parker, be received, the contract being complied with agreeably to condi- tions thereof; and John Parker was allowed $60 for building said jail. And the said John Parker, having suffered loss in the building of said jail, he is allowed $16 extra. The sheriff was allowed $8.75 for the confinement, receiving and discharging of William Shields, a prisoner.
----------
Reference:
"Kin of my Grandchildren, Vol III", Judge Noble K. Littell, 1992, p 20.
"Shields Family", Christine B. Brown, 6 February 1980, p 66.
"History of Jackson County, Indiana.", Brant and Fuller, 1886, p 330.
"History of Jackson County, Indiana.", Brant and Fuller, 1886, p 718. 
Shields, William (I42430)
 
61612 William Steve McMahan never married. He fought in the Spanish-American War and died there. Co. L 6 USVI Sp. Am. War.
----------
Reference:
Rosa Lee Downey notes, 16 June 1983, p 107. 
McMahan, William Steve (I40031)
 
61613 William T. Ogle was licensed to preach at the September 1834 meeting of the White Oak Flats Baptist Church. He was ordained at Bethel Baptist Church on the 4th Saturday of October 1836. He served the Gatlinburg church and others until his death.

In 1860, William T. and his family appear in the census records with his father in the 11th district (Gatlinburg). He was mentioned as the oldest son and was named executor of his father's will in 1862.
----------
Reference
"Smoky Mountain Clans", Donald B. Reagan, 1974, p 52.
"Smoky Mountain Clans, Volume 3", Donald B. Reagan, 1983, p 139, 174. 
Ogle, William Thomas (I2026)
 
61614 William Tailboys of Hepple.
----------
Reference:
"Ogle & Bothal", Sir Henry Ogle, 1902, p 356. 
Tailboys, William (I64507)
 
61615 William V "Taillefer," Count of Angouleme.
----------
Reference:
"Royalty for Commoners", Roderick W. Stuart, 1993, p 65. 
Taillefer, William III (I19242)
 
61616 William VI "Taillefer," Count of Angouleme died on a crusade.
----------
Reference:
"Royalty for Commoners", Roderick W. Stuart, 1993, p 65. 
Taillefer, Guillaume (William) IV Count (I19237)
 
61617 William was a soldier in the War of 1812 and received a pension for his service. After his second marriage, William moved to Sevier County, Tennessee, and later moved to Cooke County Tennessee where he died.

William went with his brother, John and his uncle John to Sevier County, Tennessee, about 1825-1826.
----------
Reference:
"Kinfolk, Ownbey Family Lines of the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina", p 4, 5, 14.
"Smoky Mountain Clans, Volume 3", 1983, Donald B. Reagan, p 65. 
Owensby, William (I9415)
 
61618 William was accidentally shot while crossing the mountains.
----------
Reference:
"Smoky Mountain Clans", Donald B. Reagan, 1978. p 16, 44, 199.
"Smoky Mountain Clans, Volume 2", 1983, Donald B. Reagan, p 192.
"Smoky Mountain Clans, Volume 3", Donald B. Reagan, 1983, p 46, 252, 257.
"The Book of Ragan/Reagan", Donald B. Reagan, 1993, p 175, 176.
Dee Lansford GEDCOM, 24 September 1995. 
Reagan, William Brownlow (I765)
 
61619 William was adopted by Henry Cecil and Nola (McCarter) Headrick, his father
was Amos McCarter.
----------
Reference:
Dee Lansford GEDCOM, 24 September 1995. 
Headrick, William Charles "Billy" (I53351)
 
61620 William was in Duxbury in 1638.

William was cooper licensed to dwell within the government, at Plymouth or
elsewhere, upon the testimony of his good behavior he hath brought with him.
Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. I. p 82.

This is the first mention of William Macomber in America. The testimony of
good behavior is likely to have been obtained from the person whom he served
hist apprenticeship in learning the trade of cooper. The date of the above
record is April 2, 1638.

Under date of 3 September 1638, are found the following records: "William
Maycumber, a cooper, is graunted an island lying on the north side Powder
Poynt, & containing about three or four acres of land, provided that the
committees of Ducborrow doe consent thereunto, and that he doe not stop the
townes cattle from the fresh water thereupon," and "Liberty is graunted to
Will'm Maycumber, cooper, to fetch tymber to make hoopes of for vessels for the
colonies use at Clarks Island and Sagaquash." Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. I.
p 95.

3 August 1640, "Will'm Maycumber is granted the wood fit for coopery growing
upon Wood Island, to be used by him so long as he followeth his trade, and
forbidding all others to cutt there except for the loading of boats and
vessells to carry away the hay." Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. I. p 159.

He settled in Marshfield, Massachusetts. In 1644 he was fined for speaking
against the Indians. He was a surveyor in Marshfield in 1653.

A sworn statement, made March 1, 1655, gives his age as 45 years. He was,
therefore, born in 1610. Tradition says that he was brother to John Macomber
of Taunton. In favor of this is the following:

"Aug. 20, 1644, William Maycomber of Duxborrow --------- sent forth to bring in
John Macomber for non-appearance for making allarum at Taunton." See
Proprietors' Records at Taunton.
----------
Reference:
"Macomber Genealogy", 1908, Everett S. Stackpole, p 89-90.
"Connections", 1985, Edward M. Macomber. 
Macomber, William (I10368)
 
61621 William was killed in the California oil fields

Buried in Brickey Cemetery.
----------
Reference:
Dee Lansford GEDCOM, 24 September 1995. 
Brickey, William M. (I52952)
 
61622 William was probably the first born of William and Zillah. After his marriage William moved to Kentucky, had four sons and two daughters. He separated from his wife and left. He remarried, but found his wife with another man and killed him. The family heard that he had been lynched, but Great Aunt Gemma said that a man visited the old home place and asked many questions regarding persons having died, old buildings torn down, even talked to his sister, Nancy, who would never admit it. Aunt Gemma felt is was her uncle in spite of the denial.
----------
Reference:
"Kinfolk, Ownbey Family Lines of the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina", p 28. 
Murphy, William (I9766)
 
61623 William Wheeler probably came to America at the same time as his father. He
died intestate and letters of administration on his estate were granted to his
widow Hannah.
----------
Reference:
"History of the Wheeler Family in America", 1914, Albert Gallatin Wheeler, Jr.,
20. 
Wheeler, William (I12124)
 
61624 William Williams was from South Carolina and lived in Hartford, Tennessee.
----------
Reference:
"A Genealogy of the Rolen Family of Sevier County, Tennessee," Wilma Rolen
Stucker, 1980, p 4, 5.
"Sevier County, Tennessee and Its Heritage", 1994, 390. 
Williams, William "Billy" (I46610)
 
61625 William Williams was from South Carolina and lived in Hartford, Tennessee.
----------
Reference:
"A Genealogy of the Rolen Family of Sevier County, Tennessee," Wilma Rolen
Stucker, 1980, p 4, 5.
"Sevier County, Tennessee and Its Heritage", 1994, 390. 
Walker, Betty (I46611)
 
61626 William, Count of Toulouse, Margrave of Septimania (Narbonne).
----------
Reference:
"Royalty for Commoners", Roderick W. Stuart, 1993, p 234. 
Toulouse, William Count Of (I37036)
 
61627 Williamd and his wife moved to and lived in Fayette County, Pennsylvania. He
served as colonel in the War of 1812.
----------
Reference:
"Family Register of Garret van Sweringen and Descendants", H. H. Swearingen,
1894, p 39, 51-52. 
Swearingen, William (I50402)
 
61628 Williams children bitterly opposed his second marriage to his first wife's niece.
----------
Reference:
"Kin of my Grandchildren, Vol III", Judge Noble K. Littell, 1992, p 15, 19.
"Shields Family", Christine B. Brown, 6 February 1980, p 62, 63. 
Shields, William (I29627)
 
61629 Wilson and Elizabeth T. were listed in the 1840 Federal Census of Sevier
County, Tennessee. There were no children in the household at this time.
Wilson McMahan died in the 1st Civil District.
----------
Reference:
"Smoky Mountain Clans", Donald B. Reagan, 1978, p 65.
"McMahan Family Tree", Glenn F. McMahan, 10 March 1932, p 1.
"The Book of Ragan/Reagan," Donald B. Reagan, 1993, p 273.
Rosa Lee Downey notes, 16 June 1983, p 8, 42, 135. 
McMahan, Wilson "Wilse" (I4264)
 
61630 Wilson bradley fought in the 69th North Carolina (Thomas Legion) C.S.A, along with his half brothers William and Thomas Bradley

Listed in the 1850 Federal Census of Rutherford County, North Carolina.
----------
Reference
"Smoky Mountain Clans, Volume 2", Donald B. Reagan, 1983, p 138, 147. 
Bradley, Wilson (I35777)
 
61631 Wilson Maples went with his parents from Pittsylvania County, Virginia to Pendleton District, South Carolina prior to 1790. There he lived with his parents until his marriage in 1801.

Wilson Maples and his family left Pendleton District, South Carolina for Sevier County, Tennessee in 1805. They settled in the area of the East Fork of Little Pigeon River.

Wilson Maples had bought 77 acres of land from James Mathis Sr. circa 1805/1806. This land was surveyed in 1807 and granted by State of Tennessee. It was located in the East Fork of Little Pigeon River area.

Wilson Maples also bought 69 acres of land at the same time. It was located in the East Fork of Little Pigeon River area and adjoined the lands of James Mathis Sr.

From RECORD OF COMMISSIONS OF OFFICERS IN THE TENNESSEE MILITIA 1796-1815, compiled by Mrs. John Trotwood Moore, Wilson Maples was appointed as a captain of 11th Regiment for Sevier County, Tennessee on 26 May 1812.

Wilson Maples served as a Captain of 11th Regiment for Sevier County, Tennessee from the date of appointment until he resigned. During the War of 1812, he served as a captain in the 5th Regiment of Tennessee militia commanded by Colonel Edwin Booth. He was drafted at Sevierville, Sevier County, Tennessee on or about 5 November 1814 for six months duty. On 25 December 1814, he was reassigned to Lookout Mountain (vicinity of Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tennessee) on account of sickness.

Wilson Maples died almost a year after he resigned from the position of captain. From deeds it is indicated that the said Wilson Maples had left a will at his death. He willed his wife, Sarah, the one half of the plantation during her lifetime or widowhood and willed that each of his children was to receive one-sixth part of the undivided interest in the other half of the plantation.

It is believed that Wilson Maples was buried in the McMahan Cemetery, Jones Cove. (A stone reads "W. M. 1845 (1815?)".)
----------
Reference:
"Smoky Mountain Clans, Volume 3", 1983, Donald B. Reagan, p 185, 186.
"The Townsend Heritage", Kathy Townsend, 1984, p 50. 
Maples, Wilson (I29805)
 
61632 Wilson McTeer, A. B. Maryville College 1925, Ph. D. University of Chicago 1930,
taught phychology for forty years at Wayne State University in Detroit Michigan
before retiring as Professor Emeritus in 1970. Author in 1972 of "The Scope of
Motivation", Brooks/Cole Publishing Co., Monterey, California.

Living in 1975 in Holiday, Florida.
----------
Reference:
McTeer - Mateer Families of Cumberland County Pennsylvania, Frances Davis
McTeer, 1975, p 124. 
McTeer, Wilson (I8627)
 
61633 Wilson was charged with the rape of a Gibson woman and plea bargained and accepted a sentence of six months in prison. He was released after serving one month. He was also excluded from the fellowship of his church for going to bed with his sister in law about the same time. It must have been the same woman.
----------
Reference:
Timothy Welch Stinnett GEDCOM, August 1995. 
Stinnett, Wilson L. (I51656)
 
61634 Winfred Irving Upchurch lost his right arm in a farming accident in 1953.
----------
Reference:
Rosa Lee Downey notes, 16 June 1983, p 132. 
Upchurch, Winfred Irving (I40482)
 
61635 WINIFRED DOWNES 18 Aug 1885 Aug 1972 97520 (Ashland, Jackson, OR) (No Location Given) 028-34-7491 Massachusetts (1962)
----------
Reference:
"History of the Wheeler Family in America", 1914, Albert Gallatin Wheeler, Jr., p 112. 
Bosworth, Winifred Sarah (I67965)
 
61636 Winilda (Guinidilda)
----------
Reference:
"Royalty for Commoners", Roderick W. Stuart, 1993, p 38. 
Flanders, Widnille Of (I29855)
 
61637 With Frank McGuiere and Mathew Rollen, all having families with them, came
in wagons to Ray County, and settled in the Missouri River Bottoms, near the
present site of Orrick.

Jacob Tarwater bought a large tract of land and owned 15 slaves.

Source: Portrait and Biographical Record says Jacob Tarwater was a native of
Germany and emigrated to America at an early age.

Notes for SARAH "SALLIE OR SALLY" ROWLAND:

Buried in Riffe Cemetery (no stone)
----------
Reference:
"Sevier County, Tennessee and Its Heritage", 1994, p 348, 349.
Curtis Tucker, cutucker@earthlink.net, 24 February 2000. 
Tarwater, Jacob Jr. (I58741)
 
61638 With husband in the Westerwald in the French Zone in early 1948. Erlecke, Ruth (I7220)
 
61639 With Lillard Maples, built the Indian Gap Hotel just below the Chimneys.

Later built the Indian Gap Hotel and later changed name to Bohanan's Cabins.
----------
Reference:
"Smoky Mountain Clans, Volume 3", Donald B. Reagan, 1983, p 23.
"Mountain Ways", Gene Aiken, 1983, p 70, 260. 
Bohanon, Ray (I1988)
 
61640 With Ray Bohanan, built the Indian Gap Hotel just below the Chimneys.
----------
Reference
"Smoky Mountain Clans, Volume 3", Donald B. Reagan, 1983, p 23, 54, 206.
Rosa Lee Downey notes, 16 June 1983, p 127.
"Smoky Mountain Historical Society Newsletter", V XXI No 1, Spring 1996, p 2.
"Mountain Ways", Gene Aiken, 1983, p 70, 260. 
Maples, Sidney Lillard (I1992)
 
61641 Within months of their marriage Calvin and Julia Mateer set sail for China and
more than twenty years of service to the cause of Missionary and Christian
Education which culminated in the establishment and recognition of Shantung
Christian University. Dr. Mateer was also active in the translation of
textbooks and was a principal editor of the revised Madarin Bible.

Julia Mateer shared in vaious teaching responsibilities, in the construction of
Chinese textbooks and was particularly successful in counselling students and
their families, in giving aid and comfort to the sick, and in conducting
religious classes for Chinese women.
----------
Reference:
McTeer - Mateer Families of Cumberland County Pennsylvania, Frances Davis
McTeer, 1975, p 110. 
Brown, Julia Ann (I8290)
 
61642 Within six weeks of the date of Samuel's wife's will (Jean Ewing) Samuel sold off his land and farming equipment and six weeks after that he was dead. Rather obviously Samuel Mateer was sick unto death for some time before his demise, and it was appropriate that his wife's family should be distressed to contemplate the future for his widow and young children.

In a militia list of 4 February, 1793, Samuel H. McTeer was shown as a resident of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, aged between 18 and 45 years.

On 5 November 1796 Samuel McTeer of Newton Township, Cumberland County, bid in at public vendue for 153 pounds, a 71 acre tract with improvements in Newton Township, which had been seized in August 1792 by the County Collector of Revenue on a judgment against Joseph Wilson late of Cumberland County for 150.78.6 pounds. Sheriff's deed dated 7 April 1797, filed 11 October 1797.

On 30 April 1798 Paul Thompson and wife Agnes of Monaghan Township, York County, conveyed to Samuel Huston McTeer of Newton Township, Franklin County, PN, for 550 pounds, 90 acres 19 perches in Monaghan Township with the usual allowance of 8 acres 113 perches. Witnesses: Edward O'Hal, John Nesbit, Hugh Thompson.

In the spring of 1803 Samuel H. Mateer announced a public vendue for Friday, 13 March 1803, to sell his land in Monaghan Township, 100 acres with improvements, grain in the ground, mare, cows, hogs, a case of drawers and a dresser. The terms of the sale were for the plantation 150 pounds down and the remainder at the rate of 30 pounds yearly; for bids under 10 shillings, cash, for bids
exceeding 10 shillings, nine months credit; and the "owner reserves one bid on each article if he sees cause." -- At the sale Major Thomas McCreary bought the plantation for 460 pounds, but before the transaction was legally completed Samuel H. Mateer was dead. In lieu of a deed the following papers were filed in York County on 16 May 1803: notice of the sale (as above) with a list of buyers; a deposition of John May that the sales notice as exhibited was in the handwriting of Samuel H. Mateer, "late of Monaghan Township, York County, who was present at the sale"; and the Prothonotary's certification that there was a valid contract between Mateer and Thomas McCreary.
----------
Reference:
McTeer - Mateer Families of Cumberland County Pennsylvania, Frances Davis McTeer, 1975, p 48-49. 
Mateer, Samuel Huston (I6987)
 
61643 Wladislaw I Herman, Prince Of Poland Poland, Wladislaw I Herman, (I18944)