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Matches 61,601 to 61,697 of 61,697

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61601 William moved to Oregon.
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Reference:
Dee Lansford GEDCOM, 24 September 1995. 
Burns, Rev. William Frederick "Rick" (I53459)
 
61602 William Peart Sr. came from England to Oxford Township, Philadelphia County,
Pennsylfania; in 1806 he bought two tracts in Armstrong County on the Alleghany
River at the mouth of Pine Run, and the following year built a sawmill there at
what was to become Mosgrove, Pennsylvania; he owned additional lands and a
grist mill in Valley Township.

The will of William Peart of Kittanning Township, written 30 July 1828,
probated 27 August 1828, bequeathed $100 to each of two grandchildren, son and
daughter of son Benjamin Peart (they lived near Philadelphia); to daughters
Susan Bainbridge and Maria Johns, certain bonds against Philip Mochling and
Simon Torney; to wife Susan her support her lifetime. A codicil of 1 August
1828 leaves land on Pine Creek and Alleghany River, "where I now reside", to
granddaughter Rachel Peart, daughter of son William L. Peart. A second codicil
same date mentions a previous deed to son William L. Peart and makes it clear
that sons, Benjamin and William were living at the time of writing. Witnesses:
E. S. (Eben Smith) Kelly, William L. Peart, Samuel McMaster.

In 1821 William Peart Sr. had conveyed to William Jr. 300 acres 80 perches in
the south part of Pine Grove and had agreed in 1828 to convey another parcel of
248 acres including grist and saw mills; this latter sale was consumated by the
widow Susan in 1832.

On 20 June 1842 Alcy Pert, widow of William L. Peart late of Pine Township,
deceased intestate, petitioned for guardianships for her children, Eliza Jane,
Margaret M., Else Anne, Nancy G., Mary Adeline, and Esther E. Peart, all minors
under fourteen years. A. L. Robinson was so appointed with James Cochran as
Surety in the amount of $600.

On 21 September 1846 an inquest of partition was requested concerning the real
estate of William L. Peart of Pine Township, 348 acres adjoining James Cochran,
Samuel Hutchinson and land previously sold by William L. Peart to Walter Sloan
his brother-in-law. Peart's heirs were eleven children: Rachel wife of William
Meaner of Indiana County, Pennsylvania, Rosanna wife of Samuel Cochran,
Susannah Peart and Samuel Peart, all of age; also William, Eliza Jane,
Margaret, Else Anne, Nancy, Adeline and Easter Peart, minors.

Before his death William L. Peart had contracted to sell part of his land,
including the mills to his brother-in-law, Walter Sloan, but there was much
delay in completing the transaction; suit was brought against Robert E. Brown,
Administrator of Peart's estate and on 3 January 1849 subpoenas were issued for
all of the heirs.

On 21 December 1846 Sharon Manteer was appointed guardian of Eliza Jane and
Margaret Peart; both girls were then over 14 years and both guardianships were
discharged 3 March 1856. Bond was for $500 with Jonathan Sloan as Surety. On
19 Jun 1849 on petition of Samuel M. Peart, Thomas McConnel was appointed
guardian for Nancy G., Adeline and Esther E. Peart, all under 14 years. Bond
was for $1000 with William Robinson as Surety.

This Peart estate was continued over many years until all of the children were
grown up and until after the death of the widow. There were distribution
payments from time to time with many releases and receipts. In a final
affidavit dated 18 February 1884, S. M. Peart lists the heirs as follows:
Isabella Peart, wife of William S. Peart, now wife of Joseph Campbell; Rachel
Peart, widow of William Manor; Rosannah Peart wife of Samuel Cochran; Susanna
Peart, widow of Samuel Sloan; Eliza Peart wife of John Meanor; Margaret Mateer
now wife of Chris Foster, only child of Margaret Peart and Robert Mateer now
deceased; William L. Frank and Adella Frank, only children of Elsi Anne Peart
and Ezra Frank both decased; Nancy P. Peart wife of A. J. Thompson; Adeline P.
Burgess; and Esther Peart wife of David Prugh.
----------
Reference:
McTeer - Mateer Families of Cumberland County Pennsylvania, Frances Davis
McTeer, 1975, p 65. 
Peart, William Lee (I6879)
 
61603 William Peart Sr. came from England to Oxford Township, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; in 1806 he bought two tracts in Armstrong County on the Alleghany River at the mouth of Pine Run, and the following year built a sawmill there at what was to become Mosgrove, Pennsylvania; he owned additional lands and a grist mill in Valley Township.

The will of William Peart of Kittanning Township, written 30 July 1828, probated 27 August 1828, bequeathed $100 to each of two grandchildren, son and daughter of son Benjamin Peart (they lived near Philadelphia); to daughters Susan Bainbridge and Maria Johns, certain bonds against Philip Mochling and Simon Torney; to wife Susan her support her lifetime. A codicil of 1 August 1828 leaves land on Pine Creek and Alleghany River, "where I now reside", to granddaughter Rachel Peart, daughter of son William L. Peart. A second codicil same date mentions a previous deed to son William L. Peart and makes it clear that sons, Benjamin and William were living at the time of writing. Witnesses: E. S. (Eben Smith) Kelly, William L. Peart, Samuel McMaster.

In 1821 William Peart Sr. had conveyed to William Jr. 300 acres 80 perches in the south part of Pine Grove and had agreed in 1828 to convey another parcel of 248 acres including grist and saw mills; this latter sale was consumated by the widow Susan in 1832.
----------
Reference:
McTeer - Mateer Families of Cumberland County Pennsylvania, Frances Davis
McTeer, 1975, p 65. 
Peart, William (I7570)
 
61604 William Ragan was born on his paternal grandfather's farm in the Emert Cove
area of Sevier County, Tennessee. Here he lived until the migration to Maury
County, Tennessee with his brother John Henry Ragan between 1840/1850.

He was listed with his mother, Susannah Ogle Ragan in the 1830 Federal Census
of Sevier County, Tennessee.

Sometime between 1840 and 1850, he and his brother John Henry Ragan migrated
together to Maury County, Tennessee from Sevier County.

The locality of his marriage his marriage has not been confirmed.

He and his wife were listed in the 1850 Federal Census of Maury County,
Tennessee. There were no children listed in the household. But they were
living next door to his brother and sister-in-law, John Henry Ragan and Amanda
Derryberry Ragan at that time.
----------
Reference:
"Smoky Mountain Clans", Donald B. Reagan, 1978, p 14.
"The Book of Ragan/Reagan", Donald B. Reagan, 1993, p 197, 198. 
Ragan, William (I3848)
 
61605 William Reason Reagan went to Texas in 1849 and settled first in Red River
County. There he attended McKinney College. After leaving that institution,
he taught school for two years at Marlin, Falls County. During his spare time,
he studied law and in 1857 was admitted to the bar. He opened an office and
practiced law. In 1874, he romoved to Reagan, a small town named for him. In
1880, he moved to Georgetown where he lived until his death.

During the Civil War, he first enlisted in the 13th Cavalry, but in 1862, was
appointed enrolling officer for Falls County. While the war was in progress,
he was entrusted with an important mission to Richmond, Virginia in the
interest of the Postal service of the Confederacy.

In 1865, he was elected judge of Falls County.

"The Waco Examiner" records an episoded that took place during the
reconstruction days in the State of Texas:

"Judge Reagan, from Falls County, was arrested on the 5th inst., on the square,
and carried to the military camp. The following are the particular: The Judge
was suspected of having thrown a brick-bat into the military camp, and upon
this suspicion was arrested by the soldiers, and liberated shortly after his
arrest. The Judge again appeared on the square armed, and the Sheriff, Mr.
Morris, interpreting his demonstration as hostile, arrested him again, and upon
which he was taken by the U.S. soldiers in the custody at their camps."
----------
Reference:
"Smoky Mountain Clans", Donald B. Reagan, 1978, p 9, 13.
"The Book of Ragan/Reagan", Donald B. Reagan, 1993, p 47, 58, 59. 
Reagan, William Reason (I727)
 
61606 William Riley Ragan was a Rural Mail Carrier.
----------
Reference:
"Joshua Reagan", Lula F. Shelton, 1982.
"The Book of Ragan/Reagan," Donald B. Reagan, 1993, p 374. 
Ragan, William Riley (I4973)
 
61607 William Rolen Stucker lists given name as William.

Johnie Williams was killed by a man named Stephens. He lived up near Chad Herrel's. He hit Johnnie on the head with an iron spikeat at a saw mill down near Curt Huff's. They brought him up to Bobby's old log cabin that afternoon where he died. Stephens went to North Carolina but was brought back to
Sevierville, Tennessee where he was kept in a mule stable until he was tried and hung.
----------
Reference:
"Smoky Mountain Clans, Volume 2", Donald B. Reagan, 1983, p 29.
"Joab and Anna (McMahan) Rolen Family", Bonita McMahan Rough, March 1995, p 3, 4, 6, 7.
"A Genealogy of the Rolen Family of Sevier County, Tennessee," Wilma Rolen Stucker, 1980, p 3.
John D. Radford Pedigree Charts, 1995, p 11.
"Sevier County, Tennessee and Its Heritage", 1994, 389. 
Williams, John "Johnnie" (I34451)
 
61608 William Sawyer came from England and is first found in Salem, Massachusetts in
1640; afterwards in Wenham, Massachusetts in 1643 and the next year in Newbury,
Massachusetts where he settled and raised his family.

William Sawyer was one of the founders of the Baptist Church at Newbury in
1682. He lived in or near what is now West Newbury, Massachusetts.
----------
Reference:
"Some descendants of William Sawyer of Newbury, Mass.", William S. Appleton,
1891.
"A Genealogy of Some of the Descendants of William Sawyer of Newbury, Mass",
Nathaniel Sawyier, 1889, p 4. 
Sawyer, William (I22239)
 
61609 William Shields immigrated from Ireland to New Castle, Delaware and settled in Frederick County, Maryland.

William Shields had a large family according to a letter written by a near relative, William Hathaway, in 1790. One descendant, John Knight Shields, was born 15 August 1858, Clinchdale, Tennessee and served as U. S. Senator and Justice of the Supreme Court of Tennessee. By many writers this William is referred to as "the emigrant."
-----------
Reference:
"Kin of my Grandchildren, Vol III", Judge Noble K. Littell, 1992, p 8, 9-10.
"Research on the East Tennessee Shields Families", Katherine Susong Harmon, abt 1968. 
Shields, William (I29652)
 
61610 William Shields lived in Delaware and Chester County, Pennsylvania.
-----------
Reference:
"Kin of my Grandchildren, Vol III", Judge Noble K. Littell, 1992, p 7.
Misty Spinelli.
"Shields Family", Christine B. Brown, 6 February 1980, p 40, 45. 
Shields, William (I9103)
 
61611